Radicchio Panzanella from “Eat This Poem”

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“Because when we eat and when we read, we honor what was made for us to consume. We savor every last bite.” -Nicole Gulotta, Eat This Poem

One of the great gifts of poetry is attention. Have you ever tried to read poetry like prose? It doesn’t work. You scan the lines and end up losing the thread halfway through. No, to read poetry you must slow down. Let the rhythm wash over you. Luxuriate with the feel of the words in your mouth. To understand poetry you have to fall in a little in love with it.

Cooking is the same. There’s a world of difference between cooking pasta and setting a pot of water to boil, adding a steady stream of salt, running your fingers through the pasta before adding it to the roiling water, and testing it until it embodies the perfect marriage of yielding and firm. When it’s done with attention and care,cooking ceases to be a chore and becomes a meditation.

If you care about both food and poetry you’re likely already following Nicole Gulotta’s brilliant site Eat This Poem. And if you’re following Nicole online- and even if you’re not- you need to check out her new book of the same name.

I say this as someone who was lucky enough to get a sneak peak of her  book. When I was taking notes for what to make I filled three pages of a legal pad. I started using symbols to keep everything straight- , a circle for make at work, a star for must-dos, a heart for date night. Her book is filled with simple, good food made with attention.

Nicole’s book is organized not around meals or seasons but by theme. These themes- On Splendor, On Moments in Time, among others- speak to the rhythms of our life. These themes are filled with poems and accompanying recipes. And what poems. I found myself lingering over old favorites from Theodore Roethke, Naomi Shihab Nye, Billy Collins, and Mary Oliver. And I fell for new to me poets like Jehanne Dubrow and Richard Levine (whose enclosed poem, “Believe This”, I emailed to two separate people in with the title OMG OMG. Look it up. Fall in Love.). There is splendor here.

It’s a brilliant idea. And what transforms a brilliant idea into a treasured work is that it works beautifully. The recipes are elegant creations, delicious and creative but written with life in mind. This is a working cookbook that exists in a space that’s been sorely neglected. Nicole is not preaching the gospel of a 30 minute meal. She’s not a chef whose sub-recipes have sub-recipes. Instead she’s an evangelist of the calming, attentive power cooking brings- choosing a peach, chopping parsley, gently cooking garlic until it’s just fragrant. These actions nourish us just as much as what we place in our mouth does, and Nicole appreciates these acts without fetishizing them.

In response to “Tree” by Jane Hirshfield, where Hirshfield speaks of “That great calm being/ This clutter of soup pots and books-” Nicole offers a segment of simple, comforting meals that feed the calm being in us. For this lovely radicchio panzanella found with Hirshfield’s poem radicchio is quickly seared then chopped. It’s then tossed with whole grain croutons, Parmesan cheese, white beans, and a punchy dressing and topped with chives. I was curious but cautious when I saw the recipe- radicchio is famously bitter and can be overwhelming. But I trusted Nicole and recommend you do the same. The heat tames radicchio’s bite enough that it will play nice with the other ingredients. It’s a dish unique enough to stop you in your tracks, but no harder than boiling and tossing pasta. And by the act of making something both commonplace and special you are are practicing the poetry of cooking.

Eat this Poem is released on March 21st and you can find it here. I already have a list of people I’ll be buying it for as gifts. Congratulations Nicole! You’ve created something truly exceptional.

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Radicchio Panzanella

Adapted from Eat This Poem: A Literary Feast of Recipes Inspired by Poetry by Nicole Gulotta, © 2017 by Nicole Gulotta. Reprinted by arrangement with Roost Books, an imprint of Shambhala Publications, Inc. Boulder, CO. www.roostbooks.com
Nicole recommends drizzling the radicchio with olive oil and sprinkling with salt and pepper, then searing it in a dry pan. I seared my radicchio in a healthy drizzle of olive oil because I was distracted and not paying close attention. (I am fully aware of this irony.) This meant that the radicchio was a bit more cooked, but was still excellent.

Serves 2-4

4 cups whole grain bread cubes (cut from about 4 slices each an inch thick)
olive oil
salt and pepper
1 pound radicchio (about 2 medium), wilted outer leaves removed and quartered
1 1/2 cups cooked white beans such as cannellini, or one 14.5 ounce can
1 cup grated Parmesan cheese, plus more for serving
minced chives

For dressing:

1 tablespoon balsamic vinegar
1 tablespoon sherry vinegar
2 teaspoons honey
1/2 cup olive oil
salt and pepper

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Place the bread cubes onto a sheet tray and toast until golden and crisp, about 12-15 minutes. Set aside and let cool.

In the meantime, warm a healthy drizzle of olive oil in a large skillet over medium-high heat. Place the quarters of radicchio in the pan and sprinkle with salt and pepper. Sear until the leaves are soft and just going brown in spots, then turn. Repeat until all sides of the radicchio have been kissed by oil. Transfer to a cutting board and roughly chop the radicchio. Place in a large bowl and top with the beans, bread, and Parmesan cheese.

To make the dressing, whisk together the balsamic vinegar, sherry vinegar, and honey. Add in the olive oil and whisk while it’s combining. Season to taste with a healthy pinch of both salt and pepper, then pour over the salad and toss well. Top with a flurry both of Parmesan and chives.

 

 

 

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Chard and Chickpea Pasta with Golden Raisins

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I’m Catholic.  For a few years I was related to a bishop by marriage. I attended a Franciscan parish throughout childhood. I can pray in English, Spanish, and Latin. There was even a summer in high school when I went to Mass every morning, although that might have been more for seeing my then-boyfriend than for spiritual nourishment.

But my relationship to my childhood faith has changed. It changed for a million reasons. Some of these are benign- studying at a Lutheran college, marrying a Protestant, attending Anglican services while living in England. Others are not. I’ve had deep qualms with the theology and disgusts with the institution. I walked out of Mass once when a Priest compared the Affordable Care Act to Maoist persecution of religion and the congregation applauded. I’ve seen fellow Catholics defending the Muslim ban, conveniently forgetting that a hundred years ago our faith was targeted in the same way. But I keep being drawn back to the Church, with reservations and with uncertainty. For all of its flaws and darkness, Catholicism is still the way I best understand God.

This week marked the beginning of Lent. Lent is one of my absolute favorite times of year. I love it for many of the same reasons as I love New Year’s. There’s an austerity and a resolve. At Mass on Ash Wednesday the priest spoke about how Lent is not a time of punishment, but of reflection. That it doesn’t exist because we are bad, but because we can be better. Lent is an invitation.

Rituals matter. And these rituals are one aspect that keeps dragging me back to the Church, over my anger and over my concerns and over my doubts.

Not to find theology lessons in my dinner, but I find meals like this particularly suited for Lent. They are simple and nourishing. There is time for questions and contemplation. Meals are rituals just as the liturgical calendar is.

But onto the pasta. Pasta is one of my favorite meals- I make it two or three times a week. Sometimes I avoid posting pasta here so I have make other foods. My most made pasta is a fail safe formula of greens and seasonings and a can of beans. It’s sustained me for many quick lunches, back-of-the-pocket dinners, and lazy date nights involving Netflix.

Here, we get the greens in beautiful rainbow chard. The stems are sauteed in a healthy dose of olive oil with garlic, capers, and golden raisins. The leaves are added in thin ribbons with a can of chickpeas, and the whole dish is topped with a good handful of feta cheese and a flurry of chopped walnuts.For a bowl of food that looks quite monochromatic it tastes like sunshine- here earthy, here a hint of sweetness, here the mellow richness of garlic. It’s a slightly Greek-esque pasta, hearty and full of good things. Having never been to Greece, I imagine this pasta would be perfect to eat on a rooftop overlooking the sea. As it is it’s perfect to eat at a dining room table, huddling in from the cold, glorying in the mundane.

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Chard and Chickpea Pasta with Golden Raisins

If you do eat fish, I would highly recommend adding two or three anchovies in with the olive oil. They melt into the oil and make everything taste just a bit more savory and a bit more like the sea.

Serves 2-4

8 ounces fusilli or other short pasta (I like whole wheat for this)
1/3 cup olive oil
1 large bunch of rainbow chard, stems diced, leaves sliced into thin ribbons
3 cloves of garlic, minced
1/4 cup golden raisins
1 tablespoon capers
2 teaspoons red pepper flakes
1 fifteen ounce can chickpeas, or 2 cups cooked chickpeas, rinsed and drained
feta, for serving
chopped walnuts, for serving

Set a large pot of water on to boil for the pasta. Add a good amount of salt to the water.

While the water boils, warm the olive oil in another large pot over low heat. Add the chard stems, garlic, golden raisins, capers, and red pepper flakes with a pinch of salt. Cook, stirring often, until everything is soft and fragrant, about 10 minutes.

Cook the fusilli according to the packaged directions, until it has just a bit of bite left. Meanwhile, add the chard leaves and chickpeas to the chard stem mixture and stir well. Let it cook until the chard leaves are beginning to collapse. If the pot runs dry,  add a bit of water. Taste everything, and add salt as necessary.

When the pasta is ready, add about 1/4 cup pasta water to the chard mixture, then drain the pasta and add to the chard. Toss well, and turn the heat up to medium just long enough for the water to reduce.

Serve hot, topped with feta cheese and walnuts.

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Galentine’s Day Buckwheat Waffles with Chocolate Sauce and Orange Whipped Cream

These waffles were photographed in my dear friend Danielle‘s kitchen. Danielle and I met the first day of college. We lived directly across the hall from each other which made it quite convenient that we saw each other a lot. She was the person who told me to read Virginia Woolf for the first time, who started a poetry club called Dead Poet’s Society our sophomore year (we would go and read poetry outside), who describes her fashion sense as “third grade cool”, who still goes by the nickname Dani Unicorn, and who broke her promise to Aaron by telling me he liked me when we were freshman. She’s a model for showing up every day with creative work and the most Gryffindor person I know. When we got married the only reason she wasn’t a bridesmaid is that she couldn’t get away from her Peace Corps service. And she saw nothing weird or abnormal with me asking her to text me a picture of her kitchen table on a whim.

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Leslie Knope (#Knope2020) from Parks and Recreation created Galentine’s Day to celebrate all the awesome ladies in her life. Galentine’s Day is for the women you call “beautiful and poetic land mermaids” and “strong, sensative musk oxes” and such. Female friendships are such a valuable thing, and I like that there’s a holiday, no matter how fictitious, to celebrate them. For a long time I didn’t feel like I understood friendship, not really. It was always difficult to make friends. Finding your place, especially as a kid, is scary and difficult, but when you find the right people? It’s perfect. Why wouldn’t you celebrate that?

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In honor of Galentine’s Day we have waffles. Buckwheat waffles, because I love the earthy, almost beer-y flavor of the buckwheat and all my favorite baked goods have some interesting flours. Whipped cream and chocolate sauce, because Leslie wouldn’t have them any other way. Orange segments for the reassurance that we’re eating fruit at breakfast (and because orange, chocolate, and buckwheat are as good friends as Leslie and Ann), and chocolate shavings because if there’s ever a time to eat chocolate for breakfast, it’s Galentine’s Day.

Danielle, you beautiful minx, thank you for letting me invade your home and morning. Happy Galentine’s Day. Love you girl.

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Buckwheat Waffles with Chocolate Sauce and Orange Whipped Cream

This batter will look quite wet, which is a good thing as buckwheat flour is dryer than all-purpose flour. Because the egg whites are folded in the batter should be made into waffles immediately. If you delay, the batter will fall and that would make sad waffles. These keep well frozen, and can easily be warmed back up in a toaster oven. I’ve learned two tricks to make these waffles crisp and caramelized and fantastic. The first is to cook them on high- preferably the highest setting your waffle maker can handle. And second is to brush the waffle iron with melted butter in between waffles, even if the waffle iron is non-stick. Those two tricks taken together make for crispy edges and a soft interior, and that contrast is what truly makes waffles great.

Makes about 6 waffles

1 cup (125 grams) all-purpose flour
1/2 cup (65 grams) buckwheat flour
1 teaspoon (4 grams) baking powder
1/2 teaspoon (2 grams) sea salt
2 eggs, separated
1 cup (250 milliliters) whole milk
1/2 cup (120 grams) whole yogurt
1/4 cup (60 milliliters) maple syrup
2 tablespoons (25 grams) butter, melted, plus more for the waffle iron
1 tablespoon (15 grams) cane sugar

To serve:

Orange Whipped cream (recipe below)
Chocolate sauce (recipe below)
Orange segments
Shaved dark chocolate (use a vegetable peeler to shave the chocolate)

In a large bowl combine the all-purpose flour, buckwheat flour, baking powder, and salt. Whisk together, and set aside.

In a medium bowl whisk together the egg yolks, milk, yogurt, maple syrup, and butter until smooth. Add to the dry mixture, and whisk until smooth.

In another medium bowl place the egg whites. Use a whisk attachment to beat the egg whites at medium-high speed to medium peaks. Once the egg whites keep their shape but the tips flop over when the beater (turned off!) is lifted, sprinkle in the sugar and beat until the peaks are stiff and glossy. Fold the stiff beaks into the rest of the batter with a rubber spatula, being careful to only stir as much as necessary and no more.

Preheat the oven to 200 degrees. Place a cookie sheet with a cooling rack on top inside of the oven.

Heat your waffle iron on the highest setting. Once it’s nice and hot brush the iron with melted butter, and then scoop the batter into the iron and press. Every iron is different- mine works best with 1/2 a cup of batter, but play with yours to find your ideal amount. Cook the waffle until it smells toasty and golden. For me, that’s longer than when my waffle iron says it’s finished. Place on the rack in the oven to keep warm, and repeat with remaining batter.

Serve waffles warm, topped with orange whipped cream, chocolate sauce, orange segments, and chocolate shavings.

Orange whipped cream

If you’d like a stronger flavor, you could add in a hit of orange juice or orange liquor.

1 cup (250 milliliters) heavy cream
zest of 1 orange
1 tablespoon (15 grams) cane sugar

In a medium bowl beat everything together on medium-high speed using a hand mixer fitted with the whisk attachment. Beat until the cream is softly whipped, when the cream balls together but is still loose.

Chocolate Sauce

This chocolate sauce is just a thin chocolate ganache. And now that you know how to make it, you can play with all sort of ratios to turn into fillings for chocolate, frostings, and sauces. This is texturally the best the day it’s made,  but it makes a very good hot chocolate. (Just warm your desired amount with your milk of choice.)

1 cup (250 milliliters) heavy cream
4 ounces dark chocolate, chopped
2 tablespoons (30 milliliters) maple syrup
1/4 heaping teaspoons (1/4 + 1/8 teaspoon) sea salt

Place the cream into a small pot. Bring the cream to a simmer, then remove from heat.

Place the chopped chocolate in a small bowl. Pour the warm cream over the chopped chocolate, then use a whisk to quickly stir the cream and chocolate together. Don’t stop whisking until the chocolate is all melted and the sauce is smooth and emulsified. Stir in the maple syrup and salt. Taste for seasonings, and adjust as necessary.

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Turmeric Latte with Cinnamon and Honey

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Aaron bought me a massage for Christmas. This week I finally got to use it. It was a luxury, truly delicious, but intense. When the masseuse was working my shoulders I gasped. They were not mobile. They were tight, aching, in a different way than the rest of my tightly wound body. “Sorry, my shoulders are not as flexible as they should be-” I tried to apologize. The masseuse, a kind and efficient woman, stopped me.

“There’s no should. We’ll go from where you are.”

My mom says that I inherited her dad’s shoulders. As soon as winter comes, they start to ache. Mobility is limited. When it’s very cold out, it feels as though where my shoulders join my back are coming apart at the seams. I’m in my 20s-late 20s, but still 20s. I feel too young for this pain.

There are two things that help relieve the pain- yoga, and a regular intake of turmeric. Going without both means I’m in pain. Using only one means the pain is dulled but still there, like a headache behind your eyes after taking Advil.

My mom takes turmeric pills for her shoulders, but I like to drink my turmeric. I’m not the only one- I used to work with a cook who would mix ground turmeric and black pepper into a water bottle in the middle of his shift. Another cook I work with makes ginger and turmeric tea every day. I prefer something a bit more gentle- turmeric and cinnamon and cardamom warmed together with honey and milk.

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Turmeric is sharp and bright, which makes it an excellent addition to savory foods. Although I prefer savory over sweet like 8 out of 10 times I’ve never gotten into savory drinks. Whole milk rounds out turmeric’s sharp edges, and honey brings out the sweet notes. Ground cardamom adds an earthy floral note, and cinnamon adds warmth and just a hint of heat. I whizz everything up in the blender then warm through on the stove, making for a luxuriously frothed drink. Aaron compared it to a chai latte, and although the taste is different it hits many of the same notes. I started drinking these turmeric lattes for pain relief, but I continue because they’re delicious. It’s always easier to consume good foods when you enjoy them.

If you’re looking for the savory end of turmeric, last week’s chana masala or my carrot and coconut dal are both excellent starts. And if you have any all-star turmeric recommendations I’d love to hear them- winter is just hitting its midpoint, which means I have a few more months of daily turmeric consumption.

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Turmeric Latte with Cinnamon and Honey

Serves 1

I prefer this drink made with fresh turmeric- I think it’s brighter and less sharp than ground turmeric. If you can only find ground turmeric, you could easily substitute it for fresh. I would start with half a teaspoon, then adjust the level of turmeric to your taste. This drink could of course be made dairy-free (almond milk works best), but I prefer it with dairy milk.

1 cup whole milk
1 teaspoon honey
1/2 teaspoon fresh turmeric, peeled and finely grated
1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1/4 teaspoon ground cardamom

Place all ingredients into an upright blender. Blend on high for 1 minute, until everything is well-mixed and frothy. Transfer into a small saucepan, and warm over low heat.

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Grapefruit and Bay Leaf Marmalade

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Marmalade is such a delightfully old-fashioned word. It reminds me of reading Matilda as a child, being whisked away to Miss Honey’s tiny cottage where she drank tea with milk and ate bread and butter and reveled in her freedom. I don’t remember if Miss Honey ate marmalade. Perhaps she couldn’t afford it, being in such debt to Miss Trunchbull. I do remember looking at Miss Honey’s life and thinking that even as sad as her situation was, it sounded impossibly cozy.

Cozy sounds good any time of year, but most of all this time, when we have snowy days and cold evenings. I love winter- I often say that I moved to Minnesota for the winters- and one thing I love most about winter is that it’s a season to be kind to yourself. In winter I find myself going on leisurely walks, drinking more tea, cuddling with Aaron and a book under blankets, and lighting candles. The Danish call it all hygge, a phenomenon that’s been welldocumented. It reminds me a bit of our American buzzword of self-care, but with less juicing.

I like that cozy is accessible and personal. There’s no insistence on designer workout gear that costs me a day’s work. I don’t have to forgo meals in favor of juices. I can make a bright, sweet-tart marmalade and eat it on toast in the morning. I can practice yoga sequences (I’m about to start this series) before work in my pajama pants. I get to choose what makes me happy, and that’s no small thing.

If this appeals to you, I would recommend making this marmalade for a cozy morning. It’s both hygge and self-care to me- I have a comforting spread for my toast, jewel bright and bittersweet. And I get to control the ingredients, which here means tart grapefruit, earthy bay leaves, sweet oranges, and enough sugar to set it.

A word of warning- there’s quite a bit of sugar here, and if you’re avoiding the stuff this isn’t the recipe for you. But this makes quite a bit of marmalade, and unless you eat a large amount of marmalade every day it will last you a long time. The finished product ends up with about 12 grams of sugar per tablespoon, which is well below the current recommendations for your daily recommended amount of sugar. I will gladly forgo desserts for a morning hit of marmalade, and perhaps you’re the same. Perhaps not. Either way I firmly believe that you know yourself best, and when you have all the information you can make an informed decision.

Whatever your marmalade decisions, I wish you cozy mornings and good breakfasts.

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Grapefruit and Bay Leaf Marmalade 

Making this marmalade is a bit like making caramel- you need to watch it carefully and use a large pot. Long sleeves and shoes are both advised, as is keeping others out of the kitchen- whether it’s pets, children, or curious partners. I would highly recommend using a thermometer to make this- in fact, I used two (a candy thermometer and an instant read to verify the candy thermometer). But if you don’t have a thermometer, watch the bubbles carefully as I describe below. You’re trying to reach the thread stage, as described here. In the past when I’ve cooked a marmalade a bit further than is ideal, I’ve been able to warm it back up with a good hit of water and bring it back to a spreadable consistency.

Makes 8 cups

2 and a half (1 pound 6 ounces) thinly sliced medium grapefruits
8 1/2 cups (3 pounds, 6 ounces) cane sugar
5 cups water
zest and juice of 1 orange
3 bay leaves

Combine everything into a very large pot. If it feels silly to cook that much marmalade into such a large pot, you’re on the right track. The marmalade will bubble quite aggressively towards the end and you’ll be grateful for the extra space. Warm the pot over medium heat, and stir together well. Bring to a simmer, and allow it to simmer, stirring often so the bottom doesn’t burn, for 40 minutes. Skim all the bright orange foam that you can as it rises to the edges of the pot. The more foam you skim, the more brilliant your marmalade will be.

After the marmalade has cooked for 40 minutes crank the heat up to high. Attach a thermometer to the side, and let the marmalade cook to 223 degrees Fahrenheit (106 degrees Celsius). Watch it very carefully. It will take a while for it to get close, then will go quite quickly. The marmalade will first froth with small, quick bubbles, then larger bubbles will start to appear. Once the whole thing is bubbling aggressively, with medium sized bubbles that are thick and sputter just a bit when they pop, you are at 223 degrees. Remove immediately from the heat. Allow it to cool, remove the bay leaves, and transfer into clean jars.

The marmalade will stay good (without being canned!) in the refrigerator for weeks.

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